Advertisement

Lake Superior Zoo: Lana the Tiger has Died

Updated: November 22, 2019 02:19 PM

Lake Superior Zoo officials say their tiger, Lana has died. The news was announced at a press conference on Thursday, as well as on the zoo's Facebook page.

Advertisement

"It is with heavy hearts that we share the sad news that Lana, our 15-year-old Amur tiger, has passed away," the post on Facebook said.

Lana's charisma and energy made her one of the star's of the zoo soon after here arrival here in 2015.

With tears in his eyes, Dave Thompson, Director of animal management told reporters, "It's a hard loss, but as with all loss, we remember the good times. We remember Lana stalking us at the window and those interactions she had with diifferent families and especially kids, and the keepers. To having been able to watch that is something I always embrace and I hope the community embraces too."

Zoo Veterinarian, Louise Beyea said Lana was diagnosed with liver disease in September. She was being treated with medication and repeated blood work testing. Although Lana had showed signs of improvement, staff noticed a change in behavior and a decrease in appetite. 

Lana was born at the Minnesota Zoo in May of 2004 and hand-raised with her sister after their mother rejected them. After living at the Riverside Discovery Center, Lana arrived at the Lake Superior Zoo in November of 2015 and had been there ever since.

Thompson said, "Lana was a charismatic animal who bravely represented her species and brought awareness to the threats Amur tigers face in the wild. The entire Zoo family will remember and deeply miss Lana, especially the keepers who have cared for her and know her best."
 

Copyright 2019 WDIO-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

Advertisement
Advertisement

WATCH: Funeral Mass for Bishop Paul D. Sirba

Trees of Hope and MOCA: Jen's Story

Spirit Mountain Needs $235K from City to Keep Hills Open

The History of Erie Mining Company Featured in Book

Police Seeking Suspect for Overdose Death

Flags Flown at Half-Staff to Honor Three Minnesota National Guardsmen

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement