Advertisement

State-by-State Look at Hurricane Impact

State-by-State Look at Hurricane Impact

Compiled from Associated Press reports
Updated: September 13, 2018 06:14 PM

More than 10 million residents in three states are under a storm watch or warning because of Hurricane Florence. Here's a state-by-state look at the hurricane's impact:

Advertisement – Content Continues Below

North Carolina

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper says there are over 12,000 people in 126 shelters as the first effects of Hurricane Florence begin to batter the state.

Cooper spoke at a news conference Thursday afternoon with state emergency management officials. The governor said tens of thousands are without power and roads are beginning to flood along the coast.

The governor said those were "early warnings of the days to come."

Cooper says officials are also in the process of opening more shelters because demand is expected to continue to increase.

Power outages in North Carolina have increased as a weakened and slower Hurricane Florence moves closer to the coast.

The two major electric utilities covering the state -Duke Energy and Dominion- and a consortium of electric cooperatives reported more than 80,000 customers without power as of early Thursday evening. That doesn't include numbers from dozens of city-operated electricity providers.

Almost two-thirds of the reported outages originated in Carteret County, along the coast about 100 miles northeast of Wilmington, North Carolina. There were also several thousand outages each in Craven, Pamlico and Onslow counties.

The numbers are expected to soar as the storm's winds and torrential rains sweep over more land. Duke anticipates 1 million to 3 million of their 4 million customers in the Carolinas will lose power from Florence.

The only route off North Carolina's Hatteras Island closed Thursday as Hurricane Florence approached.

Officials with the state Transportation Department said Thursday afternoon that N.C. Highway 12 was closed in both directions on Hatteras Island, part of the Outer Banks.

The closure means that people who chose to ride out the storm now officially have no way off the island. The two-lane highway is the only route to the mainland other than ferries.

South Carolina

South Carolina officials say more than 400,000 people have evacuated the state's coast and more than 4,000 people have taken refuge in shelters as Hurricane Florence approaches.

State Transportation Department Secretary Christy Hall said Thursday that an estimated 421,000 residents had left the coast.

Acting Department of Social Services Director Joan Meacham says shelters are about 12 percent full with the 4,000 residents. Meacham says the state can house more than 35,000 people if needed. She says 61 shelters have opened thus far, including 12 that are specially outfitted to help people with special medical needs.

Gov. Henry McMaster has ordered the evacuation of most of the state's coastline as the storm approaches.

Officials say Hurricane Florence could bring not only flooding but also landslides to South Carolina.

The National Weather Service is forecasting "significant" river flooding, especially in the northeastern portion of the state. That same area experienced dangerous flooding after Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

McMaster told reporters Thursday that up to 7 inches of rain in the state's northwestern mountains could mean landslides and dangerous conditions.

McMaster has ordered evacuations along much of the state's coast. He warned residents to be prepared to be without electricity "for a long time" in the storm's aftermath.

South Carolina's most popular tourist destination is like a ghost town. North Myrtle Beach was nearly empty Thursday as the first bands of heavy rain from Hurricane Florence approached.

A few locals briefly walked into the sand but were quickly sandblasted back by stiff winds.

Virginia

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam says residents should shelter in place and stay off the roads as Hurricane Florence starts to come ashore in the Carolinas and its effects make their way north.

Northam spoke at a news conference Thursday with emergency management officials. He says parts of Virginia will likely see tropical storm-force winds, flooding and several inches of rain.

Although the forecast for Virginia is less severe than earlier in the week, Northam says "now is not the time to let down our guard."

He notes that forecasts for the weekend show a continued threat to southwest Virginia as the storm is expected to make a gradual northerly turn.

Jeff Stern, the state's coordinator of emergency management, says there are nearly 400 people in shelters across the state.

The Virginia National Guard says 1,200 personnel are staged and ready to respond as Hurricane Florence approaches.

Guard officials said in a statement Thursday that soldiers, airmen and members of the Virginia Defense Force are staged around the state to support local and state emergency management officials. Potential missions include high water transportation, debris reduction, commodity distribution, shelter management assistance and search and rescue.

Credits

Compiled from Associated Press reports

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Relay Media Amp

New Report Highlights 'Confusing' Evacuation Orders, Communication Issues in Husky Incident

Beaner's Central holds One Week Live Festival

Kavanaugh Denies 2nd Claim of Sexual Misconduct

Bird Enthusiasts Enjoy Sightings At Hawk Weekend Festival

19th Ave East Intersection to Temporarily Close

I-35 Bridge Painting Project Continues

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement