Salvation Army red kettle Miner's Inc. match challenge starts

Starting Dec. 14th thru Christmas Eve, all Salvation Army red kettle donations made at Super One stores in the region will be matched up to $50,000 as part of the Miner's Inc. match challenge. Starting Dec. 14th thru Christmas Eve, all Salvation Army red kettle donations made at Super One stores in the region will be matched up to $50,000 as part of the Miner's Inc. match challenge. | 

WDIO
Created: December 14, 2020 10:53 PM

The Salvation Army’s annual red kettle drive has already brought in over $119,000 through the 17 kettles across Duluth.

But they still need another $100,000 to reach their goal. And starting Monday, there's a way all parts of the Northland can help. 

It's the start of the Miner's Incorporated match challenge. From today until Christmas Eve, the Miner’s will match up to $50-thousand dollars donated to kettles in front of super one stores. 

This helps magnify each donation made, and could help the Salvation Army reach its 2020 goal.

“The Miner's family and miners incorporated is looking to donate up to $50,000 dollars in a match challenge,” said Duluth Salvation Army Development Director Dan Williamson. “And for our red kettles and the work that we do here at the Duluth Salvation Army and other Salvation Army centers in the area, this is so gratefully received."

All you have to do is donate to red kettles in front of Super One stores. 

Until Christmas Eve, donations will be matched up to $50,000. This is happening at Super One location in Duluth, Superior, Virginia, Hibbing, Cloquet, Grand Rapids, and Two Harbors.
 

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