'The Shape of Water' Wins Best Picture Oscar

Created: March 05, 2018 12:07 PM

LOS ANGELES (AP) - The Cold War fantasy film "The Shape of Water" is the winner of the best picture Academy Award.

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Director Guillermo del Toro's film has been considered one of the front-runners for the evening's top honor. It received a leading 13 nominations for this year's Oscars, and won four Oscars on Sunday night.

It stars Sally Hawkins as a mute janitor who falls in love with an aquatic creature kept captive in a government lab.

Del Toro also won for best director.

Del Toro started out his speech saying he is an immigrant and referencing other Mexican directors who are also Oscar winners, Alfonso Cuaron and Alejandro G. Inarritu. The men are close friends.

Composer Alexandre Desplat's music for "The Shape of Water" won the Academy Award for best original score. He thanked his mother, who he said turns 90 this year, and del Toro.

Best actress

Frances McDormand's portrayal of a mother seeking justice for her murdered daughter in "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" has won the best actress Academy Award.

It is McDormand's second Oscar and comes for her blistering turn as a mother who feels authorities haven't done enough to investigate her daughter's rape and murder.

McDormand won a best supporting actress award for her role as a police officer in "Fargo." Her win Sunday was not a surprise - she has swept the major awards this year.

The actress opened her speech by saying if she fell over during her speech, someone should pick her up because had "some things to say." She thanked her family, telling them they fill her with everlasting joy.

She then set her Oscar on the stage and asked every female Oscar nominee to stand up, generating thunderous applause. McDormand looked joyous as she looked out on the women.

Best actor

Gary Oldman's transformation into Winston Churchill for "Darkest Hour" has won him the best actor Academy Award.

It is Oldman's first win on only his second nomination, despite his lengthy career of compelling performances. The 59-year-old had been considered the front-runner for the honor, having swept awards season.

Oldman underwent hours of makeup to become Churchill for the film, which focuses on a pivotal time in the British leader's career when he rallied his country to fight the Nazis. Oldman thanked Churchill in his acceptance speech, as well as those who worked with him on "Darkest Hour."

He also thanked his 98-year-old mother, telling her, "thank you for your love and your support. Put the kettle on. I'm bringing Oscar home."

Best original song

Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez have won their second Academy Award for best original song.

The husband-and-wife duo picked up the honor Sunday for "Remember Me" from "Coco." The pair also won best original song for "Let It Go" from "Frozen."

Robert Lopez dedicated the win to his mother who passed away. His wife said she was happy to see their category include a number of female nominees.

The Lopez's song beat out Mary J. Blige's "Mighty River" from "Mudbound"; Common and Diane Warren's "Stand Up for Something" from "Marshall"; Benj Pasek and Justin Paul's "This Is Me" from "The Greatest Showman"; and Sufjan Stevens' "Mystery of Love" from "Call Me by Your Name."

Best original screenplay

"Get Out" has won the Academy Award for best original screenplay, giving writer-director Jordan Peele a historic win.

Peele is the first African-American writer to win in the category.

His win was greeted by thunderous applause in the Dolby Theatre, which Peele tried to quiet. He said in his acceptance speech that he stopped writing his horror sensation "about 20 times because I thought it was impossible."

But Peele says he kept writing because he knew if it got made, he knew "people would hear it and see it."

Peele is also nominated for best director and "Get Out" is competing in the best picture category.

Best adapted screenplay

"Call Me By Your Name" has won the Academy Award for best adapted screenplay, making screenwriter James Ivory the oldest Oscar winner ever.

Ivory is 89 years old and was half of the famed independent filmmaking duo along with the Ismail Merchant, who died in 2015.

Ivory had wanted to co-direct "Call Me By Your Name," but ran into trouble with investors. He has said he has no plans to retire, and is working on a new screenplay.

"Call Me By Your Name" is an adaptation of a 2007 novel by Andre Aciman. Ivory thanked Aciman first during his acceptance speech, saying it's his policy to always thank the person whose work he adapted first.

He also thanked Merchant and their collaborator, the late writer Ruth Prawer Jhabvala.

Best animated feature

"Coco" is the winner of the best animated feature Academy Award.

The Disney and Pixar collaboration tells the story of a Mexican boy who dreams of being a musician despite his family's wishes.

"Coco" has drawn widespread praise for the culturally authentic way it presents Mexico's "Day of the Dead" culture.

Its signature song, "Remember Me," is also nominated in the best original song category.

The best animated short Oscar was awarded to "Dear Basketball," making former Lakers superstar Kobe Bryant an Oscar winner.

Best supporting actress

Allison Janney has won the best supporting actress Oscar for her role in "I, Tonya."

Janney won for her caustic portrayal of Tonya Harding's mother, LaVona Harding in the film about the figure skater's life.

It is Janney's first Oscar win. She has won seven Emmys for her roles on the NBC drama "The West Wing" and the CBS comedy "Mom."

The actress started her acceptance speech by joking, "I did it all by myself." She quickly changed course, saying, "Nothing could be further from the truth."

Best foreign language film

Chile's "A Fantastic Woman" has been named the winner of the best foreign language film Academy Award.

The film from director Sebastian Lelio stars transgender actress Daniela Vega as a woman who faces acrimony and scrutiny after the death of her lover. Lelio called Vega the inspiration for the film.

Best documentary feature

"Icarus" has won the best documentary feature Academy Award.

The film tells the story of a doping program used by Russian athletes through accounts from the man who says he oversaw it.

Director Bryan Fogel said in his acceptance speech that he hopes the film is a wake-up call about the dangers of Russia.

Best supporting actor

Sam Rockwell's portrayal of a racist sheriff's deputy in "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" has won the best supporting actor Oscar.

Rockwell had been considered the favorite to win the award, after picking up the same honor at the Screen Actors Guild Awards last month and other honors.

His character has been the focus of backlash against "Three Billboards" by some who see its portrayal of racism as simplistic.

Rockwell's acceptance speech focused on his love of movies, which he says his father helped foster by pulling him out of school when he was a young boy to go see a film.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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