abc
QUICK LINKS:

Strawberry Season Later Than Usual

Updated: 06/18/2014 10:38 PM
Created: 06/18/2014 5:40 PM WDIO.com
By: Briggs LeSavage
blesavage@wdio.com

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture is predicting the state's late spring will affect this year's strawberry season, and Finke's Berry Farm in Carlton expects to follow suit.

Diane Finke, one of the farm's owners, said she only plans to be about a week off her typical July 4 opening date and that the lingering snow was the major reason the season was pushed back.

"It took forever for the snow to melt,"Finke said. "So for the strawberries then to wake up, it just took longer."

Although the snow that stayed until late April harmed the plants, Finke said the two to three feet of snow that covered her eight-acre farm during the winter months was actually beneficial.

”As everyone knows, it seemed like the snow just kept coming and coming this year, which was actually great for the strawberries," Finke said. "We had an excellent cover, so the straberries are in good shape, very healthy, lots of blooms. We're excited for the season coming up."

The Agriculture Department reports that Minnesota's berry season progresses from south end of the state to the north. Farms in Northern Minnesota trail the Twin Cities crops between one and two weeks.

"In the Twin Cities, they started blooming about two weeks later than normal," Finke said. "Here, because we're up north, we don't see quite that two week difference. It comes down to around one week later, because living in the Northland, everythig tends to be later in comparison to the Twin Cities."

Finke's Berry Farm employees pick weeds on the 8-acre strawberry farm. Diane Finke, onw of the farm's owners, said this year's late spring pushed back the strawberry crop.

Front Page

  • MN Congressional Delegation and Lt. Gov. Meet at White House About Steel Imports

    Minnesota's federal lawmakers met with officials at the White House on Friday, to press their case about the problem of steel imports.

  • Gogebic Taconite Withdraws Wisconsin Application

    The state Department of Natural Resources says a company that was looking to open a huge iron mine in northern Wisconsin has officially withdrawn its plans. Gogebic Taconite was considering digging a 4½-mile long mine in the Penokee Hills just south of Lake Superior but announced last month it was closing its office in Hurley and future investment in the project wasn't feasible.

  • Firefighter Helps Deliver Daughter on Way to Hospital

    A baby who couldn't wait to arrive at the hospital is doing well after her firefighter father helped with a roadside delivery.

  • Tameicia Morris Duluth Police Searching for 2 Missing Children and Their Noncustodial Mother

    The Duluth Police Department is asking for the public's help in finding two children who have been reported missing and are believed to be with a noncustodial parent. Police say the mother is 20-year-old Tameicia Morris, who is described as an African American woman, who is 5 feet 4 inches tall, and weighs 135 pounds. Morris allegedly took the children, 7-month-old Shaniya Chism and 2-year-old Jameicia Chapman, for a visit against a court order and has not returned them home.

  • Dayton Calls for Felony-Level Penalties against Poachers

    The governor on Friday proposed a new felony-level penalty for poaching, and revoking game-and-fish privileges for up to 10 years. Current law only goes up to a gross misdemeanor penalty for poaching, and license revocations of up to only five years.

 
Advertisement