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Park Point S-Curve Will Stay Put

Updated: 05/27/2014 10:25 PM
Created: 05/27/2014 10:13 PM WDIO.com
By: Travis Dill
tdill@wdio.com

The Duluth City Council voted down the future relocation of Park Point's iconic s-curve in the neighborhood's main roadway. The decision came after passionate pleas from residents to leave the neighborhood alone.

Dozens of Park Point residents filled the city council chambers on Tuesday to fight changes to their neighborhood.

“No one is asking for this, but for some reason this is being pushed down the throats of people who live on Park Point,” Betty Sola said.

Sola is a member of the Park Point Coalition, and she said about 90 percent of her neighbors oppose the entire small are plan for Park Point.

The biggest concern was moving the s-curve that connects Lake Avenue with Minnesota Avenue closer to the Aerial Lift Bridge. Plans called for it to move from 13th street to 8th street to improve traffic flow, but residents like Mike Medlin said it would do just the opposite.

“Where is the public good and public benefit? You're moving an s-curve from one area closer to the bridge. You're creating problems you're not solving,” Medlin said.

City officials said the road alteration wouldn't happen for at least 7 years, but the unknowns stressed residents because some faced losing their homes.

“It's really been a terrible thing to think about losing our houses for something, for no good purpose,” Sola said.

Implementing the plan in the future would have required more votes by the city council, but residents didn't want it hanging over their heads.

The council voted down moving the s-curve and another plan to shift traffic onto Minnesota Avenue closer to the Aerial Lift Bridge.

However, the council did approve plans to address public access to waterfront on the lake and harbor along Park Point. The council amended those plans to include more meetings with residents to develop how the plan moves forward.

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