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Northland Continues To Prepare For Future Floods

Updated: 05/21/2014 11:04 PM
Created: 05/21/2014 8:53 PM WDIO.com
By: Laurie Stribling
lstribling@wdio.com

You've heard it before; practice makes perfect, and even in the middle of disaster the rule rings true.

The Duluth Superior Area Community Foundation is making preparation a priority. They're one of 18 foundations in the region chosen to share and exchange knowledge about disaster response.

"People are beginning to realize we don't have to make it up as we go," Nancy Beers, with Lutheran Social Service, said.

Holly Sampson, the President of the foundation, said the June flood prompted several organizations to work together and help the community. She said that's rare in other communities.

"They have been really impressed with the coordinated approach that we took," Sampson said.

Jodi Slick, with Equilibrium 3, said half of Americans live in a county that's declared a flood in the last five years, but unlike a tornado there's no visible scar.

"Once the water recedes, often people don't know that they're neighbor is still suffering," Slick said.

Several organizations have handled more than 800 cases over the last two years, but there are still about 30 families in need. That's a pretty good number considering less than 10 percent of the damages were covered by insurance.

"When a disaster like a flood happens, we need to raise funds in a short window of time," Slick said. "That's so much more important for a flood than some other disasters."

The Duluth Superior Area Foundation will be part of the program for two years.

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