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Possible Changes Revealed With Budget Cuts Facing UWS

Updated: 05/15/2014 10:39 PM
Created: 05/15/2014 4:45 PM WDIO.com
By: Laurie Stribling
lstribling@wdio.com

In the face of budget cuts and lower enrollment, the University of Wisconsin in Superior is sharing how students, staff and faculty will be impacted.

"It's tough," Director of Marketing and Communications Lynne Williams said. "It's not fun, but we have to do this in order to be prudent with our resources and provide the best possible educational experience for years to come."

Williams said the university will have to make up a $4.5 million shortage over the next five years. Cuts won't be the only solution; the university also has plans to grow revenue.

"Regardless of how well they try to manage these budget cuts, there is no good way to move forward with this much money cut from our university," Former Student Body President Graham Garfield said.

The exact outcome of the cuts is still unclear, but a couple things have been done. The university will have a private company run the bookstore starting July 1.

They'll also possibly put all marketing staff in one office and recruitment staff in one office. That has led to one job cut so far.

Custodial and grounds staff were also given letters alerting them their jobs may be at risk. No final decision have been made there. Officials are evaluating other options like hiring an outside source.

In the midst of this financial struggle, the university debuted their new Strategic Plan Thursday. It will set new goals. Those include getting students more prepared for their careers and more engaged in the community.

"The plan is more about positioning ourselves, enhancing the curriculum, focusing on things like internships and job placement," Chancellor Renee Wachter said.

A meeting with more information about budget cuts will take place next week.

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