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Wis. Bill Would Leave Mickey Mouse Out of Election Results

Created: 03/11/2014 9:06 AM WDIO.com

MADISON, Wis. (AP) - Mickey Mouse, Aaron Rodgers and other famous people and characters entered as write-in candidates for public office would not have to be counted any longer under a bill before the Wisconsin state Senate.

Current law requires every vote be counted for the candidate it was intended, even if it's Mickey Mouse or Bart Simpson. Election officials say that can be a time-consuming, laborious process.

The bill up for a Senate vote Tuesday would require in most cases that write-in candidates only be counted for registered candidates. If a certified candidate dies or withdraws before the election, all write-in votes would be counted.

The proposal received unanimous support in the Senate Elections Committee.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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