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Stadium Apartments Crashing Down at UMD

Updated: 02/26/2014 6:17 PM
Created: 02/26/2014 4:36 PM WDIO.com
By: Travis Dill
tdill@wdio.com

Construction crews are nothing new at UMD, but usually they are on campus to build something new. This week crews started demolishing some outdated apartments.

The Stadium Apartments served UMD students for 40 years. “I lived in Stadiums one year so it was nice. We lived in a double-decker apartment,” UMD's Director of Housing John Weiske said.

But Weiske didn't shed any tears on Wednesday when heavy machinery started crushing the apartments into piles of brick and rubble.

“Just for maintenance issues and those types of things I've been waiting for this to happen,” Weiske said.

He said bringing the apartments up to code with elevators, handicap accessibility and other major maintenance would have cost $12 million.

Weiske said the plan has been in the works since 2008. He said upperclassmen are moving off campus more often, but the university did need more dorms.

“So we made the plan to better accommodate our first-year students to build Ianni Hall, which has close to 300 beds for first-year students,” Weiske said.

The demolition comes after semi loads of dressers, lamps, and tables were donated to Goodwill according to Weiske.

Knocking the buildings down will free up a lot of room near Malosky Stadium. Administrators are still deciding what to do with it, but some will be used as green space along Tischer Creek according to Project Manager John Kessler.

“That's one of the ideas is to have more of an area for tailgating and game day programming for the fans, but also parking is always an issue here as well as additional sports fields. We're pretty land locked here with our campus,” Kessler said.

The demolition should give UMD some breathing room. The buildings are expected to come down by April, but officials said it could take until June for the space to turn green with grass and trees.

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