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Fairy Princess Ball Helps Make a Difference

Updated: 04/18/2014 10:27 AM
Created: 04/18/2014 9:01 AM WDIO.com
By: Brittany Falkers

Calling all princesses!  Duluth's most enchanted fundraiser, The Fairy Princess Ball, will be Sunday, April 27, from 1 - 4 p.m. at the Greysolon Ballroom in Duluth. 

Organizer Charity Rupp and her little princess Avalon stopped by Good Morning Northland Friday to talk about the royal affair. 

This will be the seventh year of this magical ball.  Each year the theme is a bit different and this time around it is all about Alice in Wonderland, according to Rupp.

During Sunday's magical celebration, princesses of all ages will join the Grand Princess March, savor spellbinding deserts (including a candy bar), pose for silly and professional photos, dance their tiaras off and more.

Kids will also have a chance to meet some real life princesses, Rupp said.

Rupp is the Director of Annual Giving and Special Events for Essentia Health Foundation and says this event is a real mix of fun and philanthropy.

Proceeds benefit the Erick Petter Person Children's Cancer Center Fund.  This fund helps families afford travel, lodging, meals and other expenses while their child is receiving cancer treatment.

Tickets for one couple (one adult and one child) is $100.  Additional Princesses are $50.  All girls will receive a swag bag fit for a queen.

Last year's Fairy Princess Ball sold out and this year's tickets are going fast.  Reserve your royal spot at FairyPrincessBall.com.

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