abc
QUICK LINKS:

Bald Eagles on Spring Migration Back to Minnesota

Updated: 03/25/2014 10:56 AM
Created: 03/25/2014 10:47 AM WDIO.com

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources says Bald eagles will be migrating back to Minnesota over the next few weeks.  DNR officials say large numbers of the majestic birds may be seen across parts of the state.

"Ice is breaking up along the rivers, so it's definitely time for folks to keep their eyes out," DNR regional nongame wildlife specialist, Lisa Gelvin-Innvaer said in a press release. "It all depends on the weather. It’s typical to see eagles coming through our area in mid-to-late March, as waters begin to open up and snow melts.”

According to the press release: Only two states, Florida and Alaska, have greater nesting populations of bald eagles than Minnesota. In 2005, researchers estimated there are more than 1,300 active nests in Minnesota.

Fall migration typically occurs as lakes and rivers freeze over, since most eagles prefer a diet of fish. Bald eagle wintering grounds ideally contain open water, ample food, limited human disturbance and protective roosting sites.

Not all bald eagles migrate southward in the fall, Gelvin-Innvaer said. In southern Minnesota, it's common for some eagle pairs to stay the winter, especially during milder winters.

“This winter we’ve had a lot more snow and cold temperatures than last year,” Gelvin-Innvaer said. “It makes carrion a bit harder for eagles to find.”

Bald eagles that stay local may begin courting and nesting as early as December or January. Other bald eagles return to their breeding territories, as soon as a food source is available.

"Eagle migration hotspots are a bit of a moving target, so it's hard to say where the eagles are right now," Gelvin-Innvaer said. "In Minnesota, the biggest migrations tend to be along the Minnesota River corridor, the north shore of Lake Superior and around Lake Pepin in southeastern Minnesota."

Adult bald eagles are easily identified by a white head and tail contrasting with a dark brown body. Bald eagles attain full adult plumage in their fourth or fifth year. In flight, bald eagles are sometimes confused with turkey vultures. However, bald eagles have a tendency to soar on flat, board-like wings, while turkey vultures fly with their wings in a v-shape.

Bald eagles are an example of how they and many other wildlife species benefit directly from donations made to the nongame wildlife checkoff on Minnesota tax forms. Checkoff dollars fund research, surveys and education for more than 700 nongame wildlife species. Each dollar donated is matched by funds from the Reinvest In Minnesota account.

The DNR’s nongame wildlife program is now streaming live video of a nesting pair of bald eagles on its website at www.webcams.dnr.state.mn.us/eagle. For additional information on bald eagles or where to view them, go to www.mndnr.gov/birds/eagles/winter_wabasha.html or www.mndnr.gov/snapshots/birds/baldeagle.html.

Front Page

  • Bentleyville Opening Weekend Draws Large Crowd

      One of the Christmas City of the North's favorite holiday traditions, the Bentleyville Tour of Lights, officially kicked off Saturday night with more than 15,000 visitors. The man behind Bentleyville, and its unofficial "mayor" Nathan Bentley says bringing the holiday light display to Bayfront Festival Park every year is about community...

  • Weekend Anchor Laurie Stribling Says Goodbye

    Weekend Anchor Laurie Stribling had her last show Sunday night. Before she left, we took a look at some of the highlights during her time in the Northland.    

  • Junior League Gives Back Through Festival of Trees

    The Junior League of Duluth helped give back to the community while also lending a hand to local small businesses this weekend. 

  • Alleged Wisc. Bank Robber in St. Louis County Jail

    A man was arrested in Duluth Saturday night after he allegedly robbed a bank in Eau Claire, Wisc. the night before. The Eau Claire Police Department responded to a bank robbery at Wells Fargo Bank in Eau Claire on Friday night.

  • Licenses, Deer Population Down for Wisconsin Deer Opener

    The Wisconsin firearm deer hunting tradition got off to a safe start as Department of Natural Resources officials said they had received no reports of accidental shootings or other injuries by mid-afternoon Sunday on the opener of the state's nine-day gun deer hunt.

 

Winter Weather Advisory

WI AREAS AFFECTED: Price
Expires: 11/25/2014 12:00 AM

Lake Effect Snow Advisory

WI AREAS AFFECTED: Ashland; Bayfield; Douglas
Expires: 11/25/2014 6:00 AM

Lake Effect Snow Advisory

WI AREAS AFFECTED: Iron
Expires: 11/25/2014 6:00 AM

Lake Effect Snow Advisory

MI AREAS AFFECTED: Gogebic; Ontonagon
Expires: 11/25/2014 7:00 AM

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement