Obama Says He's Considering 'Narrow' Syria Action

Posted at: 08/30/2013 12:18 PM | Updated at: 08/30/2013 3:10 PM

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama says he hasn't made a final decision about a military strike against Syria. But he says he's considering a limited and narrow action in response to a chemical weapons attack that he says Syria's government carried out last week.

Obama says that attack was a challenge to the world and threatens U.S. national security.

Obama's comment came after the U.S. released an intelligence assessment that found with "high confidence" that Syrian President Bashar Assad's government carried out a chemical weapons attack last week.

The U.S. says the attack killed more than 1,400 people.

Obama spoke before meeting at the White House with three Baltic leaders.

Obama: US has obligation as world leader to act

President Barack Obama says he recognizes the world and the U.S. are war-weary in the face of potential military action against Syria.

But he says the United States has an obligation "as a leader in the world" to hold countries accountable if they violate international norms.

Obama says he has strong preference for multilateral action. But he says, quote, "we don't want the world to be paralyzed."

Regarding the U.N., Obama says, quote, "there is an incapacity for the Security Council to move forward."

Despite a vote in Britain against taking action in Syria, Obama indicates that France is with him.

Obama's comments came as his administration made its intelligence case against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad for a chemical attack against civilians earlier this month.

US: 'High confidence' of Syria chemical arms use

The Obama administration says it has "high confidence" that Syria's government carried out a chemical weapons attack last week outside Damascus, the capital - killing 1,429 people.

The U.S. chemical weapons assessment says Syrian President Bashar Assad's government used an unidentified nerve agent in the attack. The report cites human and satellite intelligence that it says backs up publicly available videos and other evidence.

The unclassified report says at least 426 children died.

The report says the "high confidence" assessment is the strongest position that U.S. intelligence agencies can take short of confirmation.

It dismisses the Assad government's contention that rebels were responsible.

The U.S. says additional intelligence remains classified but is being provided to allies and Congress.

Scant foreign support for US strikes on Syria

President Barack Obama is poised to become the first U.S. leader in three decades to attack a foreign nation without broad international support or in direct defense of Americans.

Not since President Ronald Reagan ordered an invasion of the Caribbean island of Grenada in 1983 has the U.S. been so alone in pursuing major lethal military action beyond a few attacks responding to strikes or threats against its citizens.

It's a policy turnabout for Obama, a Democrat who took office promising to limit U.S. military intervention.

But he has warned Syrian President Bashar Assad that use of chemical weapons in its two-year civil war would be a "red line" that would provoke a strong U.S. response.

So far, only France has indicated it would join a U.S. strike on Syria.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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