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Women Less Likely to Get CPR from Bystanders, Study Suggests

Women Less Likely to Get CPR from Bystanders, Study Suggests

MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer
November 13, 2017 11:18 AM

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) - A new study suggests that women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and are more likely to die. Researchers think that reluctance to touch a woman's chest in public might be one reason.

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The study involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country of cardiac arrest, where the heart suddenly stops beating. Only 39 percent of women suffering one in a public location were given CPR versus 45 percent of men, and men were 23 percent more likely to survive.

Rescuers may fear touching a woman's breasts, but proper CPR doesn't involve that. It requires pushing hard and fast in the middle of the chest between the breasts.

The study was discussed Sunday at an American Heart Association conference in Anaheim.


Credits

MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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