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Not so Sweet: 75 percent of Honey Samples had Key Pesticide

They tested about 200 samples and found 75 percent had at least one of five kinds of the insecticides called neonicotinoids, or neonics. They tested about 200 samples and found 75 percent had at least one of five kinds of the insecticides called neonicotinoids, or neonics. |  Photo: WDIO, File

SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer
October 05, 2017 03:38 PM

WASHINGTON (AP) - Swiss researchers tested honey samples from around the world and found that three-quarters of them had a common type of pesticide.

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The scientists say the chemical is not near levels that would come close to harming humans, but it is a big worry for bees.

They tested about 200 samples and found 75 percent had at least one of five kinds of the insecticides called neonicotinoids, or neonics. They published the results Thursday in the journal Science.

Bees and other pollinators have been on the decline for more than a decade. Experts blame a combination of factors: the pesticide, parasites, disease, climate change and lack of a diverse food supply.

One outside expert says the study is too small to make any broad conclusions.

 


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SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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