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Trees of Hope: MOCA Continues Push for Early Detection Test

November 29, 2017 05:23 PM

Kris Greer was diagnosed with late-stage ovarian cancer 16 years ago. She calls it the "silent killer."

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"Women need to know the symptoms and they can be very vague, which is why it's often diagnosed in a late stage," explained Greer.

Those symptoms include, bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, difficulty eating, feeling full quickly, or urinary urgency. If you feel these symptoms for more than a few weeks, Greer recommends you contact your healthcare provider.

Sixteen years after her diagnosis, Greer is now a board member with the Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance, or MOCA. It's a nonprofit that offers resources and support to women facing the tough diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

"It is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers," explained Greer.

And according to MOCA, Ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Greer says there is no test for ovarian cancer, making it difficult to detect early. That's why MOCA raises funds for research - they hope to find an early detection test to help save more lives. 

You can help researchers by donating to MOCA this week during WDIO's Trees of Hope campaign with Hom Furniture. Tune in Tuesday, December 28 during our 5:00, 6:00, and 10:00 newscasts to donate during a live phone bank in the studio. You can also donate online, here.  

 


WDIO

Copyright 2017 WDIO-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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